Tuesday, August 27, 2013

It's about knowledge and empowerment

I plan to write about Piper Newton again - she's written a courageous book called, 'And Then My Uterus Fell Out', which is due out on October 1st - but for now I'd like to share the blog post she published a few days ago:

"It's about knowledge and empowerment"

She describes how her vaginal delivery has left her "with permanent disabilities, an inability to return to the workforce (at 30 years old) and... facing many high risk surgeries as [she tries to] cope with my disabilities."

Saturday, August 24, 2013

Obstetrician changes his mind about Maternal Request

Admiration and respect. These are the words I would use to describe my feelings towards Dr. Silvio Aladje, an OBGYN and maternal fetal medicine specialist at Michigan State University in the U.S.  In his blog posted yesterday, 'Caesareans Section On Demand', he describes how, after reading our book, he has changed his position in the debate over maternal request caesareans. I don't admire and respect him because he has changed his mind, but rather because he is willing to say so publicly (which not everyone would be brave enough or gracious enough to do) and because his actions are one step closer towards wider recognition that maternal request caesarean is a legitimate birth plan.

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Birthrights organisation highlights maternal request refusal

Birthrights website reads: "We believe that all women are entitled to respectful maternity care that protects their fundamental rights to dignity, autonomy, privacy and equality."  And on August 9, 2013, in its response to the Care Quality Commission consultation on changes to the ways the CQC regulates, inspects and monitors care services, Birthrights included the issue of maternal request caesareans being misunderstood and refused, alongside the issues being faced by women with various other birth choices (e.g. epidural and home birth).

The document is certainly well worth reading; and I can only hope that the CQC takes serious note of Birthrights' comments, and that its response leads us one step closer towards true autonomy and respect for the woefully misunderstood prophylactic caesarean.

Monday, August 12, 2013

Why women often don't get the birth they want

The answer to why women often don't get the caesarean birth they want is this: Their requests are blatantly refused.

The answer to why women often don't get the vaginal birth is more complicated, but there was an interesting debate today on BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour, hosted by Kirstie Allsopp.

I have much to write about it, but due to other more immediate commitments tonight, I will leave any comments for another day, and simply post the programme link here and encourage you to have a listen.

Feedback welcome!

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

NICE says a planned caesarean section SHOULD be offered to women who request it

My letter (title above) was published in the British Medical Journal today; I wrote it in response to another letter, NICE says caesarean section is not available on demand unless clinically indicated, sent in by Mandie Scamell, a lecturer in midwifery, Alison Macfarlane, a professor in women’s and child health, Christine McCourt, a professor in women’s and child health, Juliet Rayment, a research fellow, Judith Sunderland, a lecturer and programme lead in midwifery, and Mary Stewart, a research midwife.

It reads:

Refusal to follow NICE caesarean guidance is unjustified

My letter (with the title above) was published in the British Medical Journal today; I wrote it in response to another letter, NICE promises on infertility and caesarean section are unmet, sent in by Lawrence Mascarenhas, a consultant obstetrician and gynaecologist, Zachary Nash, a medical student, and Bassem Nathan, a consultant surgeon.

It reads: